Know Your Baleen Whales!

Do you know what kinds of baleen whales live in our oceans?

Baleen whales are those with baleen plates in place of teeth. These plates act like giant filtering brushes when a whale feeds. After a whale takes a gulp of water, it expels the liquid but the baleen bristles catch tiny food like krill.

Wildlife-focused design and advertising agency Peppermint Narwhal Creative designed this fun and informative illustrated chart to help you learn the different baleen whales that exist. Now you can know your baleen whales, from the massive Blue whales – the largest whale and animal in the world – to the smart Humpbacks and friendly Grays!

Know Your Baleen Whales

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The Gaze of a Cheetah

Photo by Christopher Michel / CC BY 2.0

Cheetah Gaze

The Beauty of Our Earth

A whale diving into the depths of our planet’s ocean not only shows us the beauty of the world we live in but also the biodiversity of Earth. A great photograph to celebrate the last hours of Earth Day.

Hope you all celebrated our planet today. Again, happy Earth Day to all.

Photo by Greenland Travel / CC BY 2.0

Whale Tale, Greenland

The Bateleur Eagle

Photo by Derek Keats / CC BY 2.0

Bateleur Eagle

Giraffes in Tanzania

At Ngorogoro Crater, Northern Tanzania Safari

Photo by fabulousfabs / CC BY 2.0

Giraffes

Rangers Are Protecting the Last Remaining Male Northern White Rhino in the World

There are currently seven remaining Northern White Rhinos in the world. The species has been hunted to the brink of extinction by poachers, hoping to make money by selling the animal’s horns.

After losing the only other two males in 2014, there now exists just one living male Northern White Rhino. The animal, named Sudan, currently lives at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, 200 kilometers north of Nairobi in Kenya. Sudan moved to the conservancy from the Czech Republic Dvur Kralove Zoo on December 20th, 2009, along with three female Northern White Rhinos, Najin, Fatu and Suni.

Ranger and caretaker Mohammed Doyo feeds Najin (center), a 25-year-old female northern white rhinoceros, and her companion.
Ranger and caretaker Mohammed Doyo feeds Najin (center), a 25-year-old female northern white rhinoceros, and her companion.

But the rhinos do not live at Ol Pejeta Conservancy alone. They are accompanied by a team of experienced rangers who monitor the 90,000 acres of conservation land, guarding the rhinos against dangerous poachers.

To protect these giants, the rangers work with local law enforcement agencies and use GPS trackers, radio houses, surveillance aircrafts and dogs trained to detect humans and security breaches.

Two rangers patrol the conservancy on foot and point out a human footprint.
Two rangers patrol the conservancy on foot and point out a human footprint.

A computer screen showing GPS-tracked anti-poaching patrol units is monitored by a radio operator in the radio room at Ol Pejeta.
A computer screen showing GPS-tracked anti-poaching patrol units is monitored by a radio operator in the radio room at Ol Pejeta.

The rhino horn black market is extremely lucrative. One horn can bring in more than $75,000 per kilogram or 2.2 pounds, which is the reason poachers have nearly wiped out the entire species.

These four rhinos were moved to the Ol Pejeta Conservancy to provide the most favorable breeding conditions, in the hopes of bringing the species back from the edge of extinction. It’s believed that the climate, diet and security of the conservancy gives them the best chance for repopulation.

Conservationists and scientists are also considering artificial insemination or cross-breeding the females with similar rhino sub-species and then breeding the next generation back into pure Northern White Rhinos.

Last remaining male Northern White Rhino named Sudan feeding at Ol Pejeta.
Last remaining male Northern White Rhino named Sudan feeding at Ol Pejeta.

Ranger and caretaker Mohammed Doyo with female rhino Najin.
Ranger and caretaker Mohammed Doyo with female rhino Najin.

Rangers preparing to patrol at Ol Pejeta Conservancy.
Rangers preparing to patrol at Ol Pejeta Conservancy.

Rangers go into a radio room while patrolling Ol Pejeta Conservancy.Rangers go into a radio room while patrolling Ol Pejeta Conservancy.

Ranger and caretaker Mohammed Doyo gesturing to a southern white rhino.
Ranger and caretaker Mohammed Doyo gesturing to a southern white rhino.

A giraffe walks in the distance at Ol Pejeta Conservancy as a ranger patrols on foot.
A giraffe walks in the distance at Ol Pejeta Conservancy as a ranger patrols on foot.

Image credits: Dai Kurokawa/European Press Agency